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Author Topic: Apple Computers and Active X  (Read 4873 times)

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Offline 6string

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Apple Computers and Active X
« on: August 12, 2011, 08:07:59 PM »
The new Speco Technologies DVR's I installed broadcast using Active X for remote viewing. Now the customer tells me after the installation that most of the administrators use MAC's at home and are going to be using them for remote viewing. I have emailed specotech's support but am waiting a reply. I don't think the DVR's can be change in the way they broadcast.

Is there a plug in for active x for a MAC? I only know MAC's on the surface.

Offline Markk

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2011, 09:06:51 PM »
That's easy, go to your local Apple Store and talk to one of the "Geniuses" they really are good, and if a MAC will do it they will either know how or find out how.  You will get answers from Apple way faster then anyone else involved.

Glad to see you joined here.

Mark

Reliable Telephone Service

Offline 6string

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2011, 06:33:23 AM »
I like this site already. Good suggestion and thanks for the help!

Online CMDL_GUY

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2011, 07:12:11 AM »
I like this site already.


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Offline Marc Haycook

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2011, 09:51:56 AM »
Quote
ActiveX Controls for Macintosh by Microsoft 's Michael Fanning

Macintosh ActiveX is Microsoft's native implementation of ActiveX controls for the Macintosh platform. A "control" can be loosely defined as a next-generation plug-in technology for Web browsers such as Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, and (soon) Apple's Cyberdog browser part. Controls can also be used to quickly add specialized functionality to desktop applications and development tools in addition to Web sites. Mac ActiveX provides a powerful environment for developing interactive and content-rich Web pages. ActiveX on the Macintosh retains much of the ActiveX programming model on the Win32 platform and most features; there are, not surprisingly, some important architectural differences.

Mac ActiveX is built on the Component Object Model (COM), a simple object model that provides mechanisms for object instantiation, object querying and object reference counting (a means of controlling object usage & lifetime). COM interfaces allow for flexible object design and are semantically equivalent to Java interfaces (for a definition of COM interfaces, see the beginning of the 'Architectural Overview' section at the end of this article). Macintosh ActiveX is based on a lightweight COM library which has been optimized for in-process controls. These services allow ActiveX controls to work seamlessly within a browser rather than as separate processes.

Other advanced features of Mac ActiveX make the experience of ActiveX controls more seamless than plug-ins. Transparent download, for example, permits a control to be downloaded, installed, and activated in a Web page without requiring the browser to be restarted or that the user go through any installation procedure.

This article presents a general architectural overview of Mac ActiveX and a detailed description of its software development kit. The last half discusses the mechanics of building and running ActiveX controls and details a simple modification of an SDK sample in order to create a new, custom control. Much of the information here appears in two essential SDK documents, the ActiveX User's Guide and ActiveX Technical Guide. There are pointers to additional SDK documents and other references where topics to which I refer are beyond the scope of this article. I've included definitions of some important, basic terms and concepts as they appear for anyone who might be encountering them for the first time.

The final section of the article contains important information on obtaining technical support from Microsoft for developing ActiveX controls on the Macintosh.

ActiveX and Java are complementary, not competing technologies. First and foremost, Java is a programming language. Second, Java is a set of virtual machine bytecodes that can be executed on any platform running a Java Virtual Machine (VM). Third, Java is a set of programming interfaces that define the underlying services available from Java code.

ActiveX, on the other hand, provides a totally different set of benefits focused on integrating objects created in Metrowerks' CodeWarrior environment with Web pages. ActiveX controls are native Mac applications and can be written using any of the rich MacOS services available through C or C++ interfaces.

ActiveX and OLE for Macintosh are both built on the powerful foundation of the Component Object Model. The 2.0x version of OLE was a monolithic release which incorporated COM and the OLE libraries in a single shared library (for PowerMac) or 68k Extension. The latest version of OLE has been broken out into constituent libraries which contain related functionality, one of which is the Microsoft Component Library which supports Mac ActiveX controls. This factored version of COM/OLE interacts more efficiently with Apple's Code Fragment Manager, performance is improved and less code is mapped into memory on launching an OLE application.

The latest version of COM, included in the Mac ActiveX SDK, has been optimized for lightweight, high-performance, in-process objects such as ActiveX controls. New API's make it easier for applications or controls to exploit the Alias Manager and work within the Mac-specific runtime world to deliver compelling Macintosh solutions. ActiveX controls require the use of the new Microsoft Component Library and are not compatible with OLE 2.0x.

SDK Contents OverviewThe ActiveX SDK for Macintosh consists of three separate, downloadable archives available at:

http://www.microsoft.com/intdev/sdk/mac/mactivex.html

ActiveX SDK (SDK_sea.hqx, ~2.5 MB) -- SDK, including sample controls and containers, projects, source, headers, COM libraries, and ActiveX plug-in adapter.

ActiveX Runtime (Runtime_sea.hqx, ~6000k) -- binary files needed to run ActiveX controls in commercial containers such as Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator. (Note: this archive contains the 'MS IE ActiveX Lib (PPC)' library required to use ActiveX controls in versions of Internet Explorer later than 3.0b1. If you are using 3.0b1 or earlier, the ActiveX SDK archive listed above contains all the runtime binaries required and you can skip this download.)

ActiveX Documents (Documents_sea.hqx, ~600k) -- documentation describing how to create and run ActiveX controls on Macintosh. It contains the ActiveX User & Technical Guides, as well as documents covering more advanced ActiveX topics such as asynchronous monikers and code download. This archive also includes an introduction to COM and a Component Object Model technical overview/specification.

Note that the Beta3 release of the Mac ActiveX SDK is currently being finalized and will be available by the time this article is printed. Beta3 will be fully compatible with Metrowerks CodeWarrior 11. There will be a document in the SDK correcting any information presented here which needs revision in order to build and run the Beta3 samples. The Beta2 release is fully compatible with Metrowerks CodeWarrior 10.

The ActiveX SDK for Macintosh includes:

  • Microsoft Component Library & ActiveX Plugin.
  • Sample Controls.
  • Sample Containers.
  • Source, headers, GUIDs, and other supporting files.
  • Utilities.

The Microsoft Component Library includes the most important elements of the Component Object Model, managing object instantiation, the Registry and essential COM structures. This library can be used to build other, custom interfaces. The ActiveX interfaces are built on this library and do not require the OLE 2.0x libraries. The ActiveX Plug-in permits the use of ActiveX controls in browsers that support Netscape Navigator-compatible plug-in technology.

The Microsoft Component Library was named comi2.ppc.ret in previous beta releases of the Mac ActiveX SDK. You should throw away any copies of this file which exist on your system before using the latest version of the SDK.

The SDK Sample Controls include samples demonstrating basic features of Mac ActiveX controls including property retrieval, data streaming, event handling, drawing, popup menus, dialogs, outgoing custom interfaces, and more. These samples have been designed to easily serve as the basis for writing your own controls. Metrowerks CodeWarrior version 10 or later is required for building all Macintosh ActiveX controls.

The Mac ActiveX SDK ships with several Sample Containers which provide a simple environment for testing individual controls, including a Metrowerks PowerPlant-based container that extends PowerPlant document and view classes to host controls.

SDK Utilities include tools for managing the COM Registration Database, registering and unregistering controls, GUID creation, bin-hexing, and more.
Marc Haycook
CCNA
Sport-Touring

Offline 6string

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2011, 04:30:17 PM »
Marc - I found that article as well but it's 14 years old.

Offline Marc Haycook

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2011, 05:43:13 PM »
Oops... sorry. I was trying to kill some time during some testing I was doing at work and I did some searching.
Marc Haycook
CCNA
Sport-Touring

Offline 6string

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2011, 05:01:13 AM »
Update: Speco Tech has emailed me a link to their remote software for MAC's. Thanks!

Offline stevena

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2011, 12:40:07 PM »
Just a small correction, the Mac is not (or should never be) intended to be capitalized. Its not an acronym/abbreviation like media access control, or adds moves or changes, etc. Its shorthand from Macintosh branding from the 80s and 90s from Apple.   :003:

Offline anthonyh

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Re: Apple Computers and Active X
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2011, 10:30:03 PM »
Check out QVISS SECURITY ask for lesley, tell her anthony from OLS referred you. GReat product, like it better then specco. MAc and PC viewable, remote viewable, smart phones, etc.  SO far I have been really happy with the product line.
...Please don't touch that