My Phone Techs

General => General => Topic started by: EV607797 on April 28, 2020, 09:47:38 PM

Title: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: EV607797 on April 28, 2020, 09:47:38 PM
Perfect timing.  I'm unemployed, stuck in the house for 45 days so far and my TV decides to crap out.  It's an LG 55" Smart TV and the screen completely goes dark for about one second every 5-10 seconds.  I've done the obvious stuff, disconnected power for a few hours, updated the software, etc.  It does this regardless of what is on the screen, even the menu/settings screen.  I'm pretty sure it's a power supply issue.  Can these things even be fixed?  I'm not even sure if there are any TV repair shops left around here.  Any suggestions?  :002:
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: hbiss on April 28, 2020, 10:07:23 PM
Well, I found this:

https://www.lg.com/us/support/repair-service/schedule-repair

And this:

https://www.lg.com/us/support/lg-direct-service

I assume you don't want to try fixing it yourself, right?

-Hal
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: liquidvw on April 29, 2020, 07:30:57 AM
Whats the model number?  Guessing that your problem is probably common with other users and google may shed some light on the issue.  Worked for me a few times with various TV repairs. 
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: MacGyver on April 29, 2020, 09:30:31 AM
Ed, TVs tend to go out when you turn them on or off.  They seldom go out while you're watching them.  This often does lend itself to the finding that the powersupply is going tango-uniform.  The problem with the sets today is it's all mother and daughter boards.  I didn't read Hal's links, but if you can identify the board it's often an easy fix, but the downside is ordering a board and it doesn't fix the issue. 

To echo Dave's wisdom, however, if you can search the model number sometimes you can find a...dang it.  It's not a whitepaper, but there is a term for it.  In any event it's like a recall.  A known issue has been found and you can often take it to an authorized repair shop (if you can find such a thing) and get it fixed.

Sorry to hear you're having issues.   :016:
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: EV607797 on April 29, 2020, 09:48:17 AM
I did some poking around and found a one-minute YouTube video showing how there's a ribbon cable that just needs to be re-seated.  I didn't go that far yet because someone commented that they received instructions from LG directly to unplug it, press and hold the power button for ten seconds, then plug it back in.  Lo and behold, that worked (for about an hour).  Another person said that she accomplished the same thing by just pressing and holding the power button on the remote.  That works as well with the same one-hour fix.  This leads me to believe that it's not a hardware issue, but still offers hope.  Thanks for the suggestions so far.
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: MacGyver on April 29, 2020, 07:17:10 PM
Ed, can you go into the menus and see if maybe it recently took an update?
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: EV607797 on April 29, 2020, 11:44:59 PM
Nothing that I can tell, Trace.  I checked the most recent software download that was done, which was about nine months ago and there isn't a newer one available.  What I've noticed in the day or so that I've been tinkering with it is that the 'power hold' button trick definitely works consistently.  It works without actually unplugging the set as previously mentioned.  Holding it down for about 10-20 seconds upon power up, with the remote or the one on the set, I get anywhere from 1-3 hours of good screen time.  If it acts up, I just do it again.  That will have to be my solution until I can get a job.  Thanks for the suggestions, Fellas.
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: pvj on April 30, 2020, 11:01:08 AM
When the screen goes dark do you still have sound? I have an older LG  that had sound, no picture and it was a couple of capacitors in the power supply. Cheap switching power supplies seem to go bad a fair bit.
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: hbiss on April 30, 2020, 11:07:39 AM
That will have to be my solution until I can get a job. 

In the words of my dearly departed partner: "With all the shit we know, how come we can't make any money?"

-Hal
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: jeffmoss26 on April 30, 2020, 05:27:50 PM
sorry, this is all I know:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5cneCgNA9U
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: MacGyver on April 30, 2020, 08:42:43 PM
Hey Ed, are you feeding that TV via an HDMI cable?
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: telemarv on April 30, 2020, 10:32:47 PM
Hey Ed, are you feeding that TV via an HDMI cable?

Good question? HDMI can control the set.

Also that pic you put on Facebook Ed, of the shrunken picture might be a bad cable.
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: EV607797 on May 01, 2020, 01:17:08 AM
That "shrunken picture" is my 32" from my bedroom placed in front of the original 55"!  Pretty big difference, huh?

Yes, the sound continues to work, in fact all functions work.  It's just the picture that cuts in and out.

Jeff, that's my favorite line from that movie!

The picture is completely gone now.  It does nothing but a strobe-like flash of the screen about every second when powered up.  I did think about the HDMI cable thing though.  I had a Roku streaming stick, a DVD/Blue ray player, and another cable that goes under the carpet to my laptop.  The one under the carpet was my first thought, but no.  Even with all of them disconnected, I get the same results.  All of them work fine when connected to the other TV.

I've looked at lots of information on the web and it is either bad LED strips (I hope not) or a bad power supply.  Either of these repairs aren't an option for me right now, so I'll just use this 'little' 32" until I can come up with a solution.  Thanks again, everyone.
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: MacGyver on May 01, 2020, 10:26:22 PM
Sorry to hear it's gone downhill.  You might disconnect the HDMI just to make sure the problem persists.  Long story, but turns out that can cause some of the behavior you described, even though it appeared in the system menus as well.

Oh, and Jeff.  First off, hats off for knowing 80s movies, and to that one I respond with: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uakq0aOVlMw

Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: hitechcomm on May 02, 2020, 02:24:35 PM
Ed, have you tried a hammer
Give it 2 good bangs and call me in the morning
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: CMDL_GUY on May 03, 2020, 10:21:09 AM
Ed, have you tried a hammer
Give it 2 good bangs and call me in the morning

 :011: :011: :011: :011: :011:
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: pvj on May 03, 2020, 11:05:12 PM

Yes, the sound continues to work, in fact all functions work.  It's just the picture that cuts in and out.


The picture is completely gone now.  It does nothing but a strobe-like flash of the screen about every second when powered up. 

I've looked at lots of information on the web and it is either bad LED strips (I hope not) or a bad power supply.  Either of these repairs aren't an option for me right now, so I'll just use this 'little' 32" until I can come up with a solution.  Thanks again, everyone.


If I remember correctly that's what mine did as well.I opened up the case and there were a few (3-4?) bad looking bulged out capacitors in the power supply.Cost me less than $10 to fix
Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: Butch Cassidy on September 13, 2021, 09:42:30 PM
GET SOMEONE ELSE TO PAY
Just as a reminder, if you have any manufacturer's warranty, store warranty or homeowner's protection policy, call them first. Some stores and credit card companies give extended warranties on purchases that you may not even be aware of.  Also, I have heard of homeowners insurance paying for a bad computer, so it might pay for a bad TV.  Of course you have a deductible.  You wouldn't think they would, but I have seen it happen. Maybe your house was struck by lightning or an electrical storm surge. 

DO IT YOURSELF
The easiest test for a blank LCD TV is to put it in a dark room, turn it on and turn up the volume. You can use the buttons on the TV or on the remote control.  If you have sound, the problem is probably an LED not a circuit cards.  To test further, press the button to bring up the menu on the screen.    Then shine a flashlight on the screen.  If you can faintly see the menu, then the circuit boards are probably OK and your problem is probably a bad LED.  This is called  the FLASHLIGHT TEST.

The LEDs are all connected in series like Christmas lights.  If one LED burns out, the whole string of LEDS turns off.  When this happens, your TV goes from working fine one moment to being totally blank the next.  Just like the Christmas lights do.  You can buy a whole set of new LEDs in strips on ebay for $10 or $15.  You need to know your make and model of TV. 
You have to take off the back of the TV and replace the LED strips. There may be 3 or more strips.

They do sell LED testers for $50 so you can find the bad LED, desolder it and solder in a replacement.  But why do that if you can buy all new LEDs for $10 to $15?

If this doesn't work, you have only lost $10 or $15 and your time.  And you might find it interesting to open up your TV. 

If your TV doesn't pass the sound test or the flashlight test, it is probably a bad circuit board. Or if you are lucky, it is just a ribbon cable that popped out. 

GET A PRO
If you have an expensive newer TV, it might be worthwhile to take it to a TV repairman you can find through your manufacturer's website.  He will charge at least $200 but you can get an estimate first.  If you have an inexpensive model or one that is over 5 years old, it is probably not worth fixing. 

LCD TVs have an average life of 7 years, so if yours is older than that, it is  living on borrowed time.  Like a good car battery, they just fail after 7 years or so. 

Please do not donate your broken TV to a charity even if you can get a tax deduction for it.  I know you would not even think about doing that.  Don't poor people have it hard enough already without buying a busted TV at a charity sale? 


Title: Re: Does anyone here know anything about fixing TVs?
Post by: EV607797 on September 14, 2021, 02:13:29 AM
Thanks, Butch, but this thread is from over a year ago (May 2020).  The issue has long-since been resolved.