Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: What does this circuit ID mean  (Read 8260 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online CMDL_GUY

  • Administrator
  • Location: Mt. Sidney Virginia
  • Posts: 7911
    • www.lscg.net
Re: What does this circuit ID mean
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2015, 11:10:19 AM »
FWIW

REN stands for ringer equivalence number
"Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master." - George Washington

“Remember democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet, that did not commit suicide.”   -John Adams

K4LRM

www.lscg.net

Faster horses, younger women, older whiskey, more money.

Offline EV607797

  • Moderator
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
  • Posts: 872
Re: What does this circuit ID mean
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2015, 07:20:05 PM »
I can just see someone hooking direct to a 110 v wall plug and trying to draw 5 or 10 amps thru the 24 gauge wire.

I think this is what Ed is concerned about.   I did see this one time where someone needed a convenience outlet for a wall wart in a telephone closet. The idiot wired the 120VAC side of the wall wart to a pair on the 66 block and ran a power cord from the 66 block, on the next floor, to a wall outlet!  The idiot should have installed the wall wart on the floor with the convenience outlet and ran the 9VAC@ 200ma. side through the 66 block and house cable.

Still not the best way and I wouldn't do it, but......

That's exactly what I meant, Larry.  Yes, I agree that telcos often use voltages as high as 130 volts for coin relays, T1 spans, long loops, etc., but these are at insanely low amperages, often in mili- or even micro-amps.  That's a big difference from a 120 volt control circuit with 15 or 20 amps of available current.  A short circuit would surely result in a cable fire before any overcurrent device would even detect it.
Ed Vaughn

(540) 623-7100 (V)  (910) 835-3600 (F)
EMVaughn3@Outlook.com

Online hbiss

  • Administrator
  • Location: Westchester County, NY
  • Posts: 3162
Re: What does this circuit ID mean
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2015, 09:24:00 AM »
Quote
...and ran the 9VAC@ 200ma. side through the 66 block and house cable.

Still not the best way and I wouldn't do it, but......

Isn't that exactly what Valcom does (other than it's DC) with their powered speakers? True, I would keep the speaker wiring separate from the telecom. But it's common to see it punched down along with everything else, especially when there are multiple floors and the house riser has spare pairs.

-Hal
I gotta get out of this business...

COMSYSTEC- Phone Systems | paging systems | background music systems | foreground music systems | retail music | restaurant music

Online CMDL_GUY

  • Administrator
  • Location: Mt. Sidney Virginia
  • Posts: 7911
    • www.lscg.net
Re: What does this circuit ID mean
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2015, 11:31:20 AM »
Quote
...and ran the 9VAC@ 200ma. side through the 66 block and house cable.

Still not the best way and I wouldn't do it, but......

Isn't that exactly what Valcom does (other than it's DC) with their powered speakers? True, I would keep the speaker wiring separate from the telecom. But it's common to see it punched down along with everything else, especially when there are multiple floors and the house riser has spare pairs.

-Hal

It is true, but I prefer not to do it that way. Most house cable is at best cat3 and I prefer to keep any AC voltage separate do to possible noise.
"Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master." - George Washington

“Remember democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet, that did not commit suicide.”   -John Adams

K4LRM

www.lscg.net

Faster horses, younger women, older whiskey, more money.